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This Is Part-1 Of Our multi-part article about Ways For Lowering Heating Costs in DFW With Your Existing HVAC System.  You can implement these money-saving efforts at; No, Low, Modest, to Moderate Costs.  

Part-1: Locating & Sealing Air Leaks At Ceilings.

Part-2: Locating & Sealing Air Leaks At Floors + Ductwork Sealing.

Part-3: Burying Ductwork In Attic Insulation.

Lowering Heating Costs: Locating & Sealing Air Leaks At Ceilings.   

Many articles immediately suggest replacing the HVAC System with a more efficient one.  That’s a high-cost solution — that may lower heating bills less than what we discuss in our article.

Al’s Plumbing — in Plano, TX provides Full-Service Plumbing; maintenance, repairs, and replacements for every plumbing component in your home.  Al’s sells and installs gas and electric water heaters.  Al’s is near your home in; Plano, TX; Allen, TX; Frisco, TX; and McKinney, Texas.  We service all homes in southern Collin County, TX, and northeastern Dallas County, TX with no additional travel charges.

Call Al’s Today To Discuss Any Concerns Or Problems You Have With Your Home’s Plumbing. 

We will arrange an appointment at your convenience.

Click Here To Read Part-2 Of This Article: Lower Heating Costs — Part 2



(To Skip This Section — Scroll Down To Next Double Lines

On A Side Note…  If Your DFW Home Is All-Electric

(NOTE: This Article Is Not About Heat Pumps.)

central air conditioner outside unit

Image Source: Pixabay.com

A Heat Pump Helps At Lowering Heating Costs By 1/3 Or More — As Compared To An Electric Furnace. 

(Note: A Gas Furnace Is Less Expensive To Operate Than A Heat Pump.)

(NOTE: This Article Is Not About Heat Pumps.)

Example: Heating-Costs Comparison — A 2,000 Square Foot DFW Home:

  • Electric Furnace
  • 11,775 kWh X 13.3 cents per kWh
  • $1,550. Annual Heating Cost – Electric Furnace.
  • Heat Pump — Standard Efficiency
  • 7,450 kWh X 13.3 cents per kWh
  • $ 990.00 Annual Heating Cost – Heat Pump (65% Of Electric Furnace Cost).
  • A standard-efficiency Heat Pump achieves over 1/3 savings (or more) in heating costs over an electric furnace.

Source: 13.3 cents per kWh is Texas average. https://www.energybot.com/

Click Here To Learn About Heat Pumps: AlsPlumbing.com Heat Pump Benefits (Part 1 of 4)



No, Low, Modest & Moderate Cost Ways

For Lowering Heating Costs

TIP: Almost All These Efforts Will Also Lower Cooling Costs.

photo of colorful fall leaves

Image Source: ShutterStock

Heat Travels Toward ColdYear Round:

Heat Naturally Moves By One Or More Ways — and more than one way can occur at the same time: 

Conduction: Example: When heat passes through a home’s exterior walls into the colder air outdoors.

Radiation:  Example: Turn on a kitchen stove electric burner — and heat radiates from it in all directions.

Convection: Example: When A fluid takes heat away.  When water evaporates — it takes heat with it.  This is why the outdoor temperature drops when it rains.  As rain falls, some evaporates.

  • During Winter: Heat rises out of the home through unsealed openings in ceilings.
  • As heat leaks from the home — it’s replaced with cold outdoor air through air leaks near the floors (like electrical outlets).
  • Heat is also lost through exterior walls into the outdoor air.
  • During Summer: In the southern 1/3 of the U.S. — attics can reach up to 170F degrees.
  • Heat from the attic forces into the home through unsealed openings in ceilings.
  • As heat enters from the attic — cool air is forced out of the home through air leaks near the floors (like electrical outlets).
  • Heat is also gained through exterior walls from outdoor air.

The Two Most Effective (& Least Expensive) Ways

Of Lowering Heating Costs (& cooling costs):

1. Seal Air Leaks & 2. Add Attic Insulation

  • Unsealed openings in ceilings (at light fixtures) — heated air to escape in winter and enter in summer. 
  • If your DFW home was built before 2000 — it leaks a lot of air. 
  • And, the older a home is — the more air it leaks. (details below).   

Source: https://www.snexplores.org/article/explainer-how-heat-moves#:


How Does YOUR Home Rate For Energy Efficiency?

The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index is a (standardized) measurement of a home’s energy efficiency.  This Index can be used to compare different homes — much like the “Miles Per Gallon” comparison for cars.

HERS Index Scale = 0-150.    +1 / -1 HERS Index Point = +1% / -1% Energy Efficient.

HERS Index – By Decade Built 

Note: The Older The Home, The Lower Its HERS Score. 

  • HERS Index = 300 for a pre-1950 built home.
  • HERS Index = 200 for a 1951–1969 built home (up to twice as energy-efficient as pre-1950 homes).
  • HERS Index = 140-195 for a 1970-1987 built home.

Why Does The HERS Index Have A 55% Spread Between 1970 — 1987?

  • The 1st “Energy Crises” occurred in 1973 — when OPEC placed an oil embargo on the U.S.  Oil prices increased by +400%.
  • The 2nd “Energy Crises” occurred in 1979 — when Iran reduced oil exports by nearly -90%.
  • Oil prices rose from $3/barrel (in 1972) — to $40/barrel (in 1979).  A +1300% increase.
  • This Is WHEN & WHY The U.S. Began A Tremendous Energy-Saving Mindset During The 1970’s.
  • Homes started becoming much more energy efficient during the 1970s..
  • HERS Index = 130 for a 1988-built home.    As determined by the U.S. Dept. Of Energy (DOE) in 2008.
  • HERS Index = 100 for a home built to the 2006 IECC (International Energy Conservation Code) Building Codes.
  • HERS Index = 85 for a home built to the 2009 IECC.
  • HERS Index = 75 for a home built to the 2012 IECC.
  • HERS Index = 55 for a home built to the 2015 IECC.
  • HERS Index = 45 for a home built to the 2021 IECC.
  • A 2021 IECC Building Code Compliant Home — Is Over Twice As Energy-Efficient as a 2006 IECC Compliant Home.

Sources:

  • https://www.hersindex.com/hers-index/understanding-hers-index/
  • http://www.transductiontechnologies.com/hers-index.html
  • https://www.resnet.us/wp-content/uploads/2021-HERS-Activity-by-State-1-11-22.pdf

Click Here To See Your State’s 2021 HERS Index Score:  2021 HERS Index Score — By State

(If Link Doesn’t Work — Copy This Into Your Browser:)

https://www.resnet.us/wp-content/uploads/2021-HERS-Activity-by-State-1-11-22.pdf


How Effective Are Energy-Saving Upgrades At Lowering Heating Cost?

In 2013 –The U.S. Dept. Of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study to determine how much energy-efficiency improvements could reduce heating & cooling bills in existing homes (details are below the next double lines).

STUDY RESULTS:

  • The (average) air leakage reduction (in FL study): -35%
  • The attic insulation was increased by up to +400% (from R-9 to R-36)
  • The (average) Total Energy Efficiency Increase = +30%. 
  • The maximum HERS Score for a Retrofitted Existing Home (in FL study): 80-85.
  • 80-85 HERS Score is similar to a home built to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).
  • The Total Energy Efficiency improvement notably declined in homes built starting in the 1970s.


To Skip The F: Study Details Section Below — Scroll Down To The Next Double Lines

The Details Of The Study:

In March, 2013 –The U.S. Dept. Of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study to determine how much Energy-Efficiency Could Improve.  Renovation activities were conducted in 70 foreclosed homes built from the 1950s through the 2000s. The homes were located near the coastline of central Florida, in or near Sarasota.  The area is Climate-Zone 2 – described as: “Hot And Humid.

All Homes Were; single-story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths.  slab foundation, low sloped roof, and 8-foot ceilings. 60% had concrete block exterior walls & 30% of lumber exterior walls.  All were covered with stucco.  53 of the 70 homes had single-pane, metal windows that cranked open & closed.

An Energy Audit Included Energy-Related; Equipment (HVAC, Water Heater, & Appliances), Materials (such as attic insulation), & Components (such as single-pane windows).  Air Tightness testing was performed for both;  1. the entire home and 2. the ductwork.

Most Homes Received:

  • ATTIC INSULATION to R-38 (Before: 75% of study homes had R-9 to R-26).
  • HVAC Ductwork was buried in attic insulation.
  • AIR LEAKAGE Reduction (average) -35%
  • New HEAT PUMP HVAC SYSTEM.
  • Before: Most homes had an electric furnace or baseboard heating.
  • Note: Heating Cost savings was nominal — as homes were in central Florida.
  • Note: Cooling Cost savings was larger — due to a more efficient HVAC System.
  • New Low-E, Vinyl WINDOWS.

Source: https://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/publications/pdf/fsec-rr-404-13.pdf

Energy Efficiency Improvement — By Decade Built (FL study)  

The Older The Home — The Higher The Energy-Efficiency Improvement.

DECADE           HERS Index:   

BUILT       BEFORE  /   AFTER   Efficiency Improvement        

1950’S             163                  74              +89%

1960’s             150                  86             +64%

1970’s             132                  86             +46%

1980’s            125                   81             +44%

1990’s            112                   82            +40%

2000’s           107                  85             +22%

Source: https://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/publications/pdf/fsec-rr-404-13.pdf



IN DFW

1. A NO COST Way To Possibly Lower Heating & Cooling Costs — By Up To Half.

Compare Your Electricity Retailer’s Per kWh Charge To The Lowest Price Retailer

When This Was Written  In Sept. 2022

The Highest Priced Electricity Retailer — Was Double The Lowest Priced Retailer’s Charge 

Source: https://www.ChooseTexasPower.org  This is the website used in this comparison.  There are other sites too.

  • LOWEST Priced Electricity Retailer: Rate = 12.8 cents per kWh (based on 2000 kWh per month).  Retailer: Frontier Utilities // Plan: Super Value 24
  • 24 Month Contract
  • Energy Charge for 2,000 kWh (at 12.8 cents per kWh) = $256.00. 51% of the highest-priced retailer (shown below).
  • HIGHEST Priced Electricity Retailer: Rate = 25.0 cents per kWh (based on 2000 kWh per month).  Retailer: Reliant // Plan: Conservation Plan 12.
  • 12 Month Contract
  • Energy Charge for 2,000 kWh (at 25.0 cents per kWh) = $500.00

NOTE: In Addition To The Electricity Retailer’s Charge — Oncor’s Electricity Delivery Charge Is Added.

Oncor’s Electricity Transmission & Distribution (TDU) Charge  = 4.5 cents per kWh (with any Retailer).

NOTE: DFW Is Served By 1 Natural Gas Supplier — ATMOS ENERGY.

Source: https://www.ChooseTexasPower.org


2. In DFW Lowering Heating Costs By Up To 1/4 To 1/3

Can Be Achieved By Sealing Air Leaks  

blower door test

Image Source: Shutterstock

SHOWN: A (temporary) Blower-Door Installed

Note: A Blower Door Test Provides Uniform Testing Results.

1 Air Change = All Indoor Air Was Exchanged With Outdoor Air.  1 ACH means the air exchange occurred in 1 HourDue To Air Leaks.

Today’s Texas newly built homes cannot exchange indoor-air with outdoor-air more than 3 times per hour.


Climate-Zone 3: Air Changes per Hour (ACH) – By Decade.  

ACH stands for “air changes per hour”.  It means the home’s entire indoor air was exchanged with outdoor air — through air leaks.

  • These are Air Leakage Findings from a California study.
  • The Study Was In Climate Zone-3 — DFW is also in CZ-3.
  • These results — are reasonable to apply to DFW homes (no Texas data available).

        Year Built     Air Changes Per Hour (ACH) – CA Study:

  • Pre 1960         14+   ACH
  • 1960’s              11.5
  • 1970’s              10
  • 1980’s               9
  • 1990’s               8
  • 2000 +             6
  • 2015+               Up To 3 ACH — in north TX – Climate Zone 3.

Source: https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/insulation/air-sealing-code-update_o



v To Skip This Section — Scroll Down To Next Double Lines

The Most Effective Way To Find Air Leaks In YOUR Home Is With A Blower Door Air-Leakage Test (optional)

blower door test

Image Source: Shutterstock

A Blower Door Test is a standardized test that measures any home’s air leakage.  Because it’s standardized, your home’s results can be compared to others within its age range and style.

HOW A BLOWER DOOR TEST WORKS:

  • The Blower Door creates a vacuum inside the home.
  • The vacuum creates the effect of a 20 mph wind blowing on all 4 sides of the house at once.
  • This test temporarily increases the amount of air leakage into the home.
  • During the test — air leaks are easy to locate.

Image Source: YouTube Embedded Video Link

Shown: This 5-Minute Video Demonstrates A Blower Door Test

Click On The White Arrow In Center Of Image Above To View The Video

NOTES: 

  • Many companies perform the Blower-Door test free — IF you are hiring them to do the air sealing.
  • You can purchase a Blower Door Test from some companies — and then do the air sealing yourself.
  • It’s Not Feasible to reduce an older home’s air leakage to meet today’s new home standards (Up to 3 ACH in Climate Zone 3).
  • To achieve Uo To 3 ACH — the home would have had to be built differently.
  • Sealing Air Leaks In An Existing Home — Can Create Up To -40% less air leakage.


popcorn texture ceiling

Image Source: Shutterstock

Shown; Ceiling Light

Lowering Heating Costs: Start Where Homes Leak The Most Air — The Ceilings

Click Below To See A Pie-Diagram With Percentages Of Air Lost (due to leaks) — By Location(s):

Locations Where Homes Leak The Most Air

(Note: If Link Doesn’t Work — Copy This Into Your Browser:)

https://www.sustainablelafayette.org/single-post/home-electrification-part-3-what-an-energy-audit-revealed-about-our-house

Where Homes Leak The Most Air:

  • 31% Ceilings, Floors & Walls.  Nearly 1/3 of heated/cooled indoor air leaks through openings (or gaps) in these locations.
  • 15% Ductwork (heated & cooled air leaking into the attic from the ductwork)
  • 14% Fireplace (IF damper left open when fireplace not in use)
  • 13% Plumbing Penetrations through walls.
  • 11% Doors
  • 10% Windows
  •   4% Bath & Kitchen Venting
  •   2% Outlets & Switches

Source: U.S. DOE


Simplify Lowering Heating Costs — Due To Air Leaks

An Easy Way To Locate 1. Air Leaks & 2. Inadequate Attic Insulation Safely From The Floor

 Is With A Thermal Leak Detector (shown just below) OR An Infrared-Image Camera (shown later). 

Shown: Black & Decker (brand) TLD100 (model) Thermal-Leak Detector. $25 when this article was written.

Rated 4.4 / 5 — By 4,550 Amazon Buyers.

Click On Image To: View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com

This website earns from qualifying purchases.

TIP: This Thermal Leak Detector Is All You Need To Find Air Leaks or Inadequate Insulation.  We also show thermal-image devices later.

Black & Decker TLD 100 Features:

  • Uses Infrared-Sensors to measure surface temperatures.
  • Easily identify air leaks and insufficient insulation.
  • The device shows you the temperature of the specific area — where its “spotlight” is shining.
  • When there’s a 1+ degree change — the devices’s spotlight changes color (blue = cooler & red = hotter).
  • 1. For A Reference Temperature: Read the temperature 2 feet away from where you suspect an air leak or inadequate insulation exists.
  • 2. Then, read the temperature at the location where you suspect an air leak or inadequate insulation exists.

This YouTube Video Is This Thermal Leak Detector In Use

Image Source: YouTube Embedded Link

Click On White Arrow To View Video



(To Skip This Section — Scroll Down To The Next Double Lines).

Thermal-Image Devices 

This Thermal-Image Device’s Price Is Prohibitive For Our Purposes.

Image Source: Amazon.com Embedded Link

FLIR (brand) TG165-X (model)  $425 when this article was written.

Rated 4.4 / 5 — By 1,550 Amazon Buyers.

Click On Image To: View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com

This website earns from qualifying purchases.


These Are Less Expensive Thermal-Image Devices That (USB) Connect To Your Phone

Infrared Thermal-Image USB Device For ANDROID Phones

Image Source: Amazon.com Embedded Link

FLIR (brand) One-Generation 3 (model)  $230 when this article was written.

Rated 4.3 / 5 — By 4,200 Amazon Buyers.

Click On Image To: View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com

This website earns from qualifying purchases.

 

Infrared Thermal-Image USB Device For IPhones

Image Source: Amazon.com Embedded Link

FLIR (brand) One-Generation 3 (model)  $230 when this article was written.

Rated 4.3 / 5 — By 4,200 Amazon Buyers.

Click On Image To: View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com

This website earns from qualifying purchases.

TIP: These Are Not Required.  The Black & Decker (brand) TLD100 (model) Thermal-Leak Detector will give you the same information — without an image.



Here Are Thermal-Images Showing Missing Attic Insulation: Thermal-Image Of Missing Insulation (Scroll down a little)

Note: The Colors You’ll See: Yellow = Hot.  Cold = Blue.  Note: This image was taken with a FLIR (brand) Device.

(If Link Doesn’t Work — Copy This Into Your Browser:)

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fsuresightinspection.com%2Finfrared-thermal-imaging%2F&psig=AOvVaw1xdpxVcBVx2RC6Vmb1KNat&ust=1664294357687000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAkQjRxqFwoTCPi54eHpsvoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAS


ceiling electrical box

SHOWN: Ceiling Electrical Box

Image Source: Pixabay.com

Lowering Heating Costs — By Sealing Air Leaks In Ceilings

incandescent light bulb

Image Source: Shutterstock

Shown: Incandescent Light Bulb

LED Light Bulbs Use -90% Less Electricity AND produce –90% Less Heat as a (same brightness) incandescent light bulb.

In Older DFW Homes — Why Do Ceilings Leak So Much Air? 

Before 2014 — Incandescent Light Bulbs Were Used.  Incandescent bulbs burned very hot — and that heat was vented into the attic through holes in ceiling electrical boxes.   Those ventilation holes cause 24/7 air leaks.  The older the home — the more holes exist in the ceiling electrical boxes.   

Click Here To See An Older Metal Ceiling Electric Box With Many Vent Holes: Old Ceiling Electrical Box With Many Vent Holes

(If Link Doesn’t Work — Copy This Into Your Browser:)

https://www.google.com/search?q=old+ceiling+junction+box&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjqvuDIgbP6AhXLj2oFHVT8ByQQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1097&bih=554&dpr=1.75#imgrc=9IQAli98LOX2iM

Just Below Is An Example Of Today’s Ceiling Electrical Box.  They’re Nearly Airtight.

 Image Source: Amazon.com Embedded Link

SHOWN: This Is What Today’s Ceiling Electrical Boxes Look Like — They’re Nearly Airtight.

  • During Winter: Vent holes in ceiling electrical boxes provide a path for heat to exit into the attic 24/7. 
  • During Summer: Vent holes provide a path for heat to enter the home from an attic 24/7. 
  • In summer, in the southern 1/3 of the U.S. – attics can reach up to 170F degrees. 

 

  • Sealing Openings In Ceilings Provides The Most Energy Savings Of All Air-Sealing Efforts.
  • Ceiling openings are also the most difficult to seal.  
  • You must remove the light fixture, (or ceiling fan) to gain access in order to seal the electrical box.   
  • TIP: This is the time to update fixtures & ceiling fans if you wish.
  • Seal The Electrical Box’s Vent Holes with common household caulk.  
  • + Add caulk where the electrical wires enter the electrical box.   
  • + Seal any gap around the box (between it and the ceiling).

Here Are Examples Of Large Air Leaks Hiding Under Light Fixtures & Ceiling Fans:

TIP: Older homes metal ceiling boxes.  Newer have plastic.   There’s No Benefit In Replacing Existing Ceiling Electrical Boxes. Just Seal; Gaps + Vent-Holes + Where Electrical Wires Enter.

Metal Ceiling Electrical Box-1:  Metal Ceiling Electrical Box-1.  A large gap exists around the electrical box.

Metal Ceiling Electrical Box-2:  Metal Ceiling Electrical Box-2.  Many vent-holes in an older box PLUS A large gap exists around the entire electrical box.


What’s Needed To Begin Lowering Heating Costs 

By Sealing Ceiling (& wall) Electrical Boxes:

Shown: Inexpensive Caulk For Caulking Gun (Free Delivery For Amazon Prime Members)

TIP: The Long Nozzel Is Needed To Reach Where Electrical Wires Enter The Electrical Box.

Click On Image To; View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com.

This website earns from qualifying purchases.

 

NOTE: We Typically Recommend The Least Expensive Product Available (when an article is written).

In Some Cases – We Recommend The Highest Rated Product (by actual buyers).

Shown:  Caulking Gun

Click On Image To; View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com.

This website earns from qualifying purchases.


Lowering Heating Costs With LED Retrofit Light-Covers For Existing Recessed-Light Fixtures

TIP: There’s No Need To Replace Existing Can Lights

Image Source: YouTube Embedded Video

SHOWN-1: The Image Above Shows The Tremendous Amount Of Air Leakage Through A Recessed Can Light.

Image Source: YouTube Embedded Video

SHOWN-2: The Image Above Shows Gap (between light & ceiling) — Also Allowing Tremendous Air Leakage.

Click Here To See A Thermal-Image Showing Cold Air (blue) Leaking Downward Through A Recessed Can Light: Cold Air Leaking In At Recessed Can Light

(If Image Doesn’t Work — Copy This Into Your Browser):

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nlcpr.com%2FCeilings.php&psig=AOvVaw38k8aTeNt9zBlOArOk5VD7&ust=1664295086050000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAkQjRxqFwoTCKDxur3ssvoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAE


How To Retrofit Existing Recessed Light Fixtures — With LED Light-Covers

This YouTube Video Demonstrates How To Retrofit/Upgrade Existing Can Lights With LED Light-Covers

Image Source: YouTube Embedded Video.

Click On White Arrow In Center Of Image To View The Video.

Benefits Of A Retrofit LED Light-Cover:

  • NO Electrician Is Needed.  You don’t have to remove the old fixture.  These screw into the old fixture just like a light bulb.
  • Once Caulked To The Ceiling — these fixtures don’t allow air leakage around the fixture.
  • LED bulbs use -90% less electricity than incandescent bulbs.
  • LED bulbs produce use -90% less heat than incandescent bulbs (that your a/c must recool).

You’ll Achieve 2 Air-Sealing + 2 Reduced Electricity-Use Solutions:

  • Seal the air gap between the existing recessed-can and the ceiling.
  • Stop air moving through the vent-holes of the old fixture
  • Dramatically reduce electricity usage.
  • Dramatically reduce heat generated.

popcorn texture ceiling

Image Source: Shutterstock

SHOWN: “Popcorn” Textured Ceiling

TIPS:

  • Because most DFW homes have “Popcorn” Textured Ceilings:
  • Don’t add caulk along the outside edge of the light-cover.
  • Instead, add caulk along where the back side rises (where the light is).
  • WHY? If a caulked light-cover must be removed later — it will likely remove the popcorn texture.
  • This will be covered by the lip of the light-cover  (once reinstalled).

Retrofit LED Light-Covers — Light Color Is Selected With A Switch On The Back  

Shown:  (4) LED Retrofit Cover-Lights — Fits 5″ & 6″ Existing Recessed Can Lights.  4″ Also Available.

Click On Image To; View Product, Read Details, or Purchase from Amazon.com.

This website earns from qualifying purchases.

TIP:  Choose Your Preferred Lighting Color (2700K, 3000K, 3500K, 4000K, or 5000K) — With The Slider Switch On The Back Of The Fixture.

TIP: For Larger Quantities Of Lights — Scroll Down Within The Page

(Note: This Particular Brand Shows Colors Where The Light Is Located — See Above).




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This Was Part-1 Of Our Multi-Part Article About Uncommon Ways For Lowering Heating Costs.  Its focus was on sealing air-leaks.  Al’s Plumbing — in Plano, TX provides Full-Service Plumbing; maintenance, repairs, and replacements for every plumbing component in your home.  Al’s sells and installs gas and electric water heaters.  Al’s is near your home in; Plano, TX; Allen, TX; Frisco, TX; and McKinney, Texas.  We service all homes in southern Collin County, TX, and northeastern Dallas County, TX with no additional travel charges.

Call Al’s Today To Discuss Any Concerns Or Problems You Have With Your Home’s Plumbing. 

We will arrange an appointment at your convenience