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The Article Is About Polybutylene Water Pipes

Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C in Plano, Texas provides maintenance & repairs for all brands of Central A/C, Gas & Electric Furnace, and Heat Pumps.    Additionally we sell and install new HVAC Systems from American Standard (same company as Trane), Ameristar (same company as American Standard) and Coleman HVAC (same company as York HVAC).

Al’s also provides full service plumbing maintenance, repairs and replacements for every plumbing component in your home.  Al’s sells and installs Rheem Professional Series gas & electric water heaters, and tankless water heaters.  Al’s is near your home in Plano, TX; Allen, TX; and Frisco, TX.  We service all homes in southern Collin and Denton Counties with no additional travel charge.

Call Al’s today to discuss any concerns or problems you have with your HVAC System or Plumbing.  We will arrange an appointment at your convenience and offer 24/7 Emergency Service.

As with most industries — plumbing products evolve over time.  In most cases, the new products are less expensive to make and /or easier to install.  In both cases, they reduce the cost to add plumbing to a home.  Additionally, there are many instances where the new product is superior to what it replaced.

For Example: When PVC (white plastic) sewer lines were invented — they became a new industry standard.  No only are they less expensive to make, they are much easier to install.  They also outlast cast iron by as much as double the lifespan.

Perhaps The Worst Plumbing-Product Failure In U.S. History Was Polybutylene Water Pipes

Image Source: YouTube Embedded Video

Click On The White Arrow In The Center Of The Image To View A YouTube Video Describing Polybutylene Water Pipe Failures

 

Polybutylene (PB) Water Pipes History In The U.S.

Polybutylene water pipes were installed in up to 10 million newly built U.S. homes between 1978–1995.  At least 6 million homes were built on-site by home builders.   35% of the homes were built in the southern U.S. during these years had PB pipes (Source: Texas Monthly,  Nov. 1990, Page 62).   3 million manufactured homes were manufactured with PB from 1976 –1996.   Texas home builders who installed PB pipes in some new homes included; U.S. Home, Fox & Jacobs,  David Weekly Homes, Monarch Homes, and General Homes (Source: Texas Monthly).

Polybutylene Water Pipes were significantly cheaper than copper and PB installation was faster — often shaving days off a whole house plumbing installation.   Installing PB was so easy that some plumbers trained non-plumber employees to install it — and incorrect installations were common.   Most PB pipes’ homes are in the sunbelt.  PB was also used in the Mid Atlantic and Northwest Pacific states.

The Primary Manufacturers Of Polybutylene Water Pipes Were:

  • Shell Chemical Company — Brand Name: Qest (pronounced “quest”).  It’s identified with “”Qest-C-PB 2110” stamped on the pipe.
  • Another brand was: Vanguard.   It is identified with: “Vanguard Plastics” stamped on the pipe.

 

At First, A Hard Plastic (Acetal Resin) Fitting Was Used To Make Connections. 

  • Just like copper pipe — PB was designed to be installed in straight pieces.
  • Where the direction of the pipe changed — a fitting was to be used so the PB pipe was not bent nor curved.
  • Fittings were inserted into the flexible PB pipe, then a clamp was added to hold the PB pipe tight to the fitting.
  • After a short time, many fittings began to show discoloration, others began to crack, while others failed completely.  The failure was due to chlorine in the water.
  • The majority of leaks in PB pipes started occurring between 10-15 years of age.

 

Leaks started occurring in the early 1980s.  At first, the majority of the leaks occurred at the pipe fittings.  The plastic fittings and PB pipe became brittle due to exposure to the chlorine in the water.  They became brittle on the inside toward the outside — once the cracks reached the exterior of the fitting or pipe — leaks began.  In earlier installations, there were 10-20 plastic fittings from the main water line to each plumbing fixture.  Later installations included a new component (a manifold — more on this below) which dramatically reduced the number of fittings needed.

The primary problems with the PB pipe itself are; stress-fractures, pinholes and cracking of the pipes.

 

Identifying Polybutylene Water Pipes Installed In A Home

In most DFW slab-foundation homes, PB pipe was installed under the slab.  The pipes come upward through the slab at plumbing fixtures locations.   It’s also possible the water lines are installed in the attic — and come downward to plumbing fixtures.

Image Source: ShutterStock

Though the (red and blue) pipes shown in the photo above are PEX — the photo depicts how water pipes are installed under the slab in DFW homes.

 

Places Where You May See Polybutylene Water Pipes:

PB pipes are typically gray — but may be black, white or blue.

  • Protruding From Walls And Connecting To Sinks & Toilets

Click Here To See PB Pipe Under A Sink: PB pipe under sink

Click Here To See PB Pipe To A Toilet:  PB pipe to toilet

  • Near A Water Heater

Click Here To See PB Connecting To A Water Heater:  PB Pipes Connected to water heater

 

  • In The Attic:

Click Here To See A PB Installation In An Attic: PB Pipe Installation In Attic

  • In A Basement:

Click Here To See A PB installation In A Basement: PB Pipe Installed In A Basement

 

A Polybutylene Water Pipes Installation May Include A Manifold.  Manifold units were added to later PB Pipes installations to reduce the number of fittings required. 

Click Here To See A PB Manifold: PB Pipe Installation Manifold

NOTE: Manifolds are typically installed today in homes with PEX (flexible) water lines today.

  • Plumbing manifolds route a separate water line to each plumbing fixture — and provide a shut-off for each fixture.
  • They were installed to minimize the number of fittings needed to plumb a house. 
  • They are typically located in an easily accessible location.  In slab-foundation homes, the manifold is likely near the water heater.  
  • A manifold couldn’t completely eliminate fittings.  Some fittings were needed to change water pipe direction And/Or accommodate a structural-components of the house.    

 

NOTE: Some plumbers used “Copper Stub Outs” (copper pipe connected to PB pipe behind the wall).  In those homes, the PB pipes are often completely hidden behind walls.

 

Click Here To See A Copper Stub-Out Connected To Flexible (PEX) Water Line: Copper Stub-Outs Connected To Flexible Water Line

 

Click Below To View How Difficult It Can Be To Determine if PB Pipe Is Present Inside The Walls — Without Removing Portions Of Walls (photo is of a shower). 

PB Pipe Hidden Behind Walls

 

Polybutylene Water Pipes Timeline

  • Late 1960’s — Celanese Corporation (brand: Celcon) and DuPont Corporation (brand: Delrin) developed the polymer Acetal Resin (a form of plastic) used in the manufacturing of plastic products.
  • Acetal Resin fittings were used in earlier PB pipes installations.     In 1965, a researcher working for Celanese said: ”Failure usually occurs when chlorine deposits build up on the Acetal Resin.”
  • 1970’s — Shell Oil Company was exploring a plastic by-product from their petrochemical refining processes — polybutylene.  Shell was the sole producer of Polybutylene resin.
  • 1975  U.S. Brass designed and manufactured PB plumbing systems using materials made of polybutylene (pipe) and acetal resin (fittings).
  • 1975   U.S. Brass Corporation bought polybutylene resin from Shell and Celcon from Celanese.
  • U.S. Brass sold its products under the Qest (pronounced “Quest” brand name.   This brand of PB pipe is stamped with “Qest-C-PB-1210”.

Click Here To See A Photo Of Qest (pronounced  “Quest”) Brand PB Pipe:  Qest Brand PB Pipe

 

  • 1980, Vanguard Plastics in Kansas began producing: PB Pipe & fittings under the brand name: Vanguard Thermoguard.  This pipe is stamped with: “Vanguard Plastics”.

Click Here To See A Photo Of Vanguard PB Pipe: Photo Of Vanguard PB Pipe.

 

Click Here To See Polybutylene Water Pipes Fittings Made Of Acetal Resin (scroll down): Acetal Resin Fittings First Used In Early PB Installations

At the beginning, both U.S. Brass and Vanguard manufactured fittings made of Acetal Resin.

  • U.S. Brass officials said they were not aware of the chlorine-degradation problems because Celanese did not tell them.
  • U.S. Brass stopped making plastic fittings.  Fittings were then made of brass or copper.
  • U.S. Brass redesigned PB pipe systems to utilize a ”manifold’.   This dramatically reduced the number of fittings used.
  • The manifold is a single, large, easily accessible fitting for all the tubing in the home.    Some fittings were still used — to accommodate the home’s structural components.

Click Here To See A Polybutylene Water Pipes installation Without A Manifold:  PB Pipe Installation W/O A Manifold.

Click Here To See Polybutylene Water Pipes installation WITH A Manifold: PB Pipe Installation WITH A Manifold

  • In 1986, Celanese stopped sales of Acetal Resin for plumbing fittings.
  • In 1988, U.S. Brass commissioned a study of Celanese (brand Celon) fittings by an engineering consultant. 
  • The study concluded that Celanese had to know, at early as 1975, that chlorinated water was harmful to Celcon. 
  • Donald E. Duvall of L.J. Broutman and Associates Ltd. wrote: “By 1976, Celanese research showed that Celcon begins to deteriorate dramatically in water containing as little as 0.5 Parts Per Million chlorine (PPM).”
  • The chlorine level maintained in many U.S. water supplies is up to 4PPM.
  • Mid-1987 Houston’s Moriarty & Associates filed a lawsuit against; General Homes Corporation (a home builder), U.S. Brass, Shell, and Celanese.
  • The suit was filed on behalf of about 100 homeowners alleging their plumbing systems were failing and leaking.
  • Moriarty’s research led him to believe there was a vast potential for polybutylene plumbing litigation.
  • 1988, U.S. Brass (with assistance from Shell and Celanese) established an 800 number to respond to consumer complaints about leaking plumbing.  It was known as the “Qest Repair Line”.
  • 1990 Celanese stopped selling Acetal Resin (brand name Celcon) — for use in plumbing products.   Note: Acetal Resin continues to be used in other plastic products (not including plumbing).
  • On Dec 30, 1990, CBS 60 Minutes aired the episode “The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread” with correspondent Ed Bradley.
  • The episode exposed polybutylene water pipe installations’ failures to the entire nation.
  • 1991 Shell, Celanese, and DuPont took over the (U.S. Brass) toll-free number and renamed it the “Plumbing Claims Group”.
  • March 1993 “Good Morning America” reported approximately 500 calls a month were coming into the PCG toll-free number.
  • Sept. 1993  The first nationwide polybutylene plumbing Class Action Lawsuit was filed (Robert Beeman vs. Shell Oil Company).
  • October 1994  The Beeman settlement was settled for $750 billion.
  • 1995 — Shell and Celanese added an additional $100 million the fund — for a total of $850 million.
  • 1995 — The total fund was increased an additional $100 million — for a total of $950 million.
  • 1996 — Shell Oil Company stopped selling Polybutylene resin.
  • June 1998  Nearly 60% of the fund had been spent for over 220,000 replumbs.  Approximately 10 million homes were built with PB plumbing.
  • A month after the Global Settlement Was Approved — Shell and Hoechst Celanese added another $150 million to the settlement fund — for a total of $1.1 Billion.
  • In 2017 another Class Action Lawsuit was filed. (Hurt vs. Shell Oil).
  • JUDGMENT: The complaint is dismissed with prejudice.  Signed by Judge D. P. Marshall Jr. on 7/6/2018.
  • Note: Dismissal with prejudice is a final judgment.  The case may not be pursued again.

Source:  https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monograph_reports/MR969/MR969.ch14.pdf

Source: Chttps://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1986-11-13-8603250425-story.html

 

Pin Holes & Cracks Often Form In Polybutylene Water Pipes (unrelated to fittings)

Click Here To See A Sagging PB Pipe.  PB Pipe Was To Be Installed With Adequate Supports): Unsupported & Sagging PB Pipe

Click Here To See A Crack & Pinhole In A PB Pipe (not bent): Cracked PB Pipe (leaking)

Click Here To See A Large Split In A PB Pipe (not bent): Large Split In PB Pipe (leaking)

Click Here To See A Large Split In A PB Pipe (not bent): Close-Up Photo Of A Large Split In PB Pipe

Click Here To See A Pin Hole Leak In PB Pipe At A Bend: Pin Hole Leak In PB Pipe — At A Bend

 

Factors That Contributed To PB Pipe Installations Failures

What Caused PB Pipe Installations To Fail:

  • When the inside surface of a PP pipe is exposed to chlorine — its antioxidants are “burned off”.
  • Once the antioxidants are gone, the interior surface of PB pipe degrades and becomes brittle.
  • Over time, surface cracks in the pipe moved deeper into the wall of the pipe toward the exterior of the pipe).

*** Click Here To See A PB Pipe Damaged By Exposure To Chlorine (scroll down):  PB Pipe After Exposure To Chlorine (scroll down)

*** Source: https://www.plasticexpert.com/plastic-technology/polypropylene-pipe-failure/

  • PB pipe is rated at up to 2 parts per million (PPM) of chlorine in the water.
  • In the U.S. — up to 4 PPM is considered acceptable, and common in many locations.
  • Two studies by the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown that higher levels of chlorine react with polybutylene.  This causes it to flake apart at any location within the PB piping system.

Installation Errors:

  • Many PB pipe systems were installed incorrectly.  The tool used to crimp the metal band often wasn’t properly situated.

Click Here To See An Earlier Crimping Tool Used For PB Pipe: Earlier PB Crimping Tool

  • ‘This often resulted in the metal band being crimped too tight, too loose and/or at and angle.

Click Here To See A Properly Crimped (metal band) & One That’s crimped At An Angle: Properly & Improperly Crimped (angled) Metal Bands

  • Over-crimping resulted in hairline cracks in the fitting and /or pipe.
  • Improper installation of having curves in the pipe.  This stressed the pipe at the bend — which made it susceptible to forming pin-holes or cracks where the bends were.
  • Water pipe direction changes were supposed to include a fitting — versus bending the pipe.

Click Here To See A Pin Hole Leak In PB Pipe At A Bend: Pin Hole Leak In PB Pipe — At A Bend

  • Installation near heat sources, water heaters and in areas of excessively high temperatures (including attics).
  • Note: There were a lot of PB pipes installed in attics in southern states — where attic temps can reach 150+ in summer.

What Happens Over Time:

  • Additionally, small fractures in either the plastic fittings and/or the PB pipe deepen over time — and work their way to the pipe’s exterior
  • The original plastic fittings were used in earlier installations.  Later the plastic fittings were eliminated and metal fittings were used.

This Was The Original Installation Method For PB Pipe:

  • PB systems were installed much like a copper water pipes — with straight sections of pipe cut to fit between two fittings.
  • Turns were to be made with elbows, and branch connections with tees.
  • Connecting to fittings were done with a new crimping tool & method.  This allowed the pipe & fittings to be put together without glue.
  • The new process required crimping a small ring or band near the end of a piece of pipe — with a a plastic barbed fitting inserted inside the PB pipe.
  • Initially, aluminum crimp-rings and Acetyl Resin (plastic) fittings were the standard for PB pipe connections.
  • Over-crimped (too much pressure was applied) joints were showing up as split or broken fittings.
  • Under-crimped (too little pressure was applied) or missed crimps were also leaking.
  • Measures to stop the PB problems were put into place.
  • The PB Pipe Industry’s solution was to use copper or brass fittings & copper crimp rings. **13

 

NOTE: Some homes have copper “stub out fittings” added by some plumbers — so little or no PB pipe was exposed.   When the drywall went up the house appeared to be piped entirely in copper.

 

When A Home Is Being Sold –Some Areas Require Disclosure Of PB Pipes *6

When purchasing a home built between 1978 — 1995, pay special attention to the plumbing system.  In many locations, PB Pipe disclosures from the previous homeowner or realtor may not be required.

  • Polybutylene piping can affect a home’s value.
  • Some Real Estate Agents (representing the seller) require a PB pipes disclosure — to protect the agent from liability.
  • Some Real Estate Agents (representing the buyer) won’t show homes with PB pipes.
  • Laws in some locations require the seller to disclose that the home has PB pipes.
  • Laws in some locations require disclosure of any latent defects when selling a home.

A latent defects may be defined as: “material defects in real property, or an improvement to real property that:

(1) A purchaser would not reasonably be expected to observe by a careful visual inspection

AND

(2) Would pose a direct threat to the health or safety of the purchaser, or an occupant of the real property.

Source: https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/legal-remedies-if-home-seller-lies-conceals-defect-texas.html

Source: https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/selling-texas-home-disclosure-obligations.html

 

Two PB Disclosure Forms Are shown Below (copy the link into your browser to view)

The Arizona Association Of Realtors’ (Sellers) “Residential Seller Disclosure Advisory” (property disclosure form) — specifically asks if the Seller knows the home has PB Pipes (Page 3 of 7)

  • Source: https://www.aaronline.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/seller-property-disclosure-statement.pdf

 

The Florida Realtors “Seller’s Property Disclosure – Residential” — specifically asks if the Seller knows the home has PB Pipes (Section: 4, Question: G).

  • Source: http://www.unlimitedmls.com/forms/Property-Disclosure-Form.pdf

 

Note:  We are not lawyers — nor do we make any representations regarding property disclosure laws.   Consult with your Real Estate Agent and/or a Lawyer.

 

A Home Inspection Often Determines That A Home Has PB Pipes — Particularly With Attic Installations.

 

Click Here To See Photos Of Attic Installation Of PB Pipes: Attic Installation Of PB Pipe (top row of photos — third from left)

 

If You Have PB Pipes — Review Your Homeowner’s Insurance Policy To See If Damage Caused By PB Pipes Is Covered.   

Many homeowners’ insurance companies do not insure homes, or cover plumbing water damage from PB Pipes.

Source: https://www.harrylevineinsurance.com/what-to-do-if-you-have-polybutylene-pipes/

 

Copy The Link Below Into Your Browner To Read An Article About H.O. Insurance Not Covering Water Damage Caused By PB Pipes:

https://www.policygenius.com/homeowners-insurance/does-homeowners-insurance-cover-plumbing/

Main Points Of The Article (link just above) Include:

  • “When plumbing damage isn’t covered: Polybutylene plumbing, a style of piping that was common in homes built between the 1970s and 1990s, may not be covered if it ruptures and causes damage.
  • That’s because this piping is notoriously faulty and viewed as high-risk to insurers — as chemicals in public water (such as chlorine) were found to make the pipes brittle and cause breakage.
  • If you have a home with polybutylene plumbing, your insurer may make note of that during your home’s underwriting process — and specifically, exclude PB pipe repair and any water damage caused by it.

SUMMARY

It’s possible PB pipe systems with copper fittings may be reliable & safe to continue using. 

There appears to be agreement that Acetal Resin fittings often fail due to exposure to chlorine. 

There appears to be agreement that improper installation of Acetal Resin Fittings may have contributed to their failure.  

There is no way to know which fittings were installed in a home.  Most of the PB water lines systems are hidden behind walls. 

 

We have presented samples of pinholes, cracks or ruptures of the PB pipe itself. 

Because PB pipe was flexible — some installers bent the pipe when a direction change was needed.   

This was incorrect installation and places stress on the pipe within the bend.   

Direction changes were to be done with a fitting. 

Click Here To See A Pin Hole Leak In PB Pipe At A Bend: Pin Hole Leak In PB Pipe At A Bend

 

We have presented examples of U.S. tap water — with chlorine levels as much as double what PB can tolerate.

Ample evidence shows that PB pipe will eventually fail due to exposure to chlorine in U.S. Tap Water. 

How long PB Pipe lasts may partially be attributed to the amount of chlorine in the tap water and / or water pressure.

PB Pipe Manufacturers State That PB Pipe Has Performed Well In Europe & Asia

In An Article (link shown below) Manufacturers Of PB Pipe State:

  • PB failures in the U.S. was due to the use of fittings made of Acetal Resin (a form of plastic).  Chlorine gas attacks susceptible polymers — including as acetal resin.
  • U.S. PB pipe installations failures were caused by the use of Acetal Resin fittings and / or improper joint-assembly techniques.
  • Acetal resin was used to manufacture the plastic fitting that were initially used with PB pipe installations in the U.S.
  • Plastic fittings were only used in the U.S. — the rest of the world used copper fittings with PB pipe.
  • Acetal resin is not suitable for use in the transportation of hot water with a high chlorine concentration.
  • Plastic fittings were used in the U.S. between the late 1970’s — late 1980’s.
  • Copper fittings were used in most installations from the late 1980’s — late 1990’s.   NOTE: This does not guarantee a home built during these years does not have has plastic fittings.
  • When polybutylene pipes were first being installed — a crimping-tool was used to secure PB pipes & fittings.  Improper crimping may have caused leaks — due to being crimped too loose or too tight.
  • PB pipe itself has not failed due to exposure to chlorine in Europe of Asia.
  • Chlorine is used to treat and purify water all over the world, and the water piped to our homes contains some amount of chlorine.

Source: https://www.pbpsa.com/polybutylene-faq

PB Pipe’s Tolerance To Chlorine:

  • A Shell Chemical Co. official stated: “Polybutylene should not be used in systems where it would be exposed to more than 2 PPM (of chlorine).”   Source: WashingtonPost.com ​
  • PB Manufacturers State: “No such experience of failure has occurred in the last 50 years that Polybutylene plumbing products have been used in Europe and Asia.”  *11
  • PB Manufacturers State: Polybutylene pipes are expected to have a service lifetime of 25 years when exposed to water containing 2 PPM chlorine at 68°F.   (Test Report-No. PB 1087C, Infraserv Höchst Technik, 2004).  **6

Chlorine Levels In The U.S. Water Are Much Higher Than Asia And Europe

PB Manufacturers State: Polybutylene pipes are expected to have service lifetimes of 25 years when exposed to water containing 2 ppm chlorine at 68°F.   (Test Report-No. PB 1087C, Infraserv Höchst Technik, 2004).  **6

PB Manufacturers State: “The stated “Polybutylene plumbing systems” mentioned in the US legal case were pipes made from Polybutylene joined to fittings made from acetal resin. Premature failures were caused by the use of acetal fittings and poor joint-assembly techniques. Acetal is not suitable for use in the transportation of hot water with a high chlorine concentration, however Polybutylene performs well under similar conditions.” *11

Inspectapedia.com States: “The majority of leak problems with polybutylene supply lines involve failure of plastic fittings.  Fitting failure may lead to the need for system replacement.” **12′

U.S. Chlorine Level Examples — Compared To Asia & Europe

  • In the U.S. — Chlorine levels up to 4 parts per million (ppm) are considered safe in drinking water **7
  • Dallas, TX had 1.92 — 2.46 parts per million (PPM) of chlorine.       Source:  City Of Dallas 2016 Water Quality Report
  • Hialeah, Florida (near Miami) had 2.6 — 4.5 PPM of chlorine.        Source: https://www.hydroviv.com/blogs/water-quality-report/tagged/florida

ASIA:

  • The Tokyo Metropolitan Government’s standard for chlorine in drinking water is between 0.1 ppm and 1 ppm. **8
  • China currently requires that each liter of tap water be treated with just 0.05 PPM of chlorine.  **9

EUROPE:

England keeps the residual disinfectant chlorine to 0.5 PPM or less.

Switzerland Half of tap water hasn’t been treated in any way. *10

 

** 6 Source: https://www.pbpsa.com/uploads/files/resources/pbpsa-pb1-faq-en-2.pdf   Page 3 (of 17) in the report.

**7 Source:  https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/public/chlorine-disinfection.html

**8 Source:  https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/12/22/national/chlorine-level-1600-times-normal-found-drinking-water-served-infants-nursery/#.XkQhIDJKiUk

**9 Source: https://qz.com/619014/chinas-tap-water-could-be-a-major-breeding-ground-for-superbugs/

**10 Source: https://greentumble.com/10-countries-with-the-best-quality-tap-water/

**11 Source: https://www.pbpsa.com/polybutylene-faq

**12 Source: https://inspectapedia.com/plumbing/PB_Piping.php

**13 Source: http://www.ashireporter.org/HomeInspection/Articles/Take-Another-Look-at-Polybutylene-Plumbing/955

Based On What We Have Presented In This Article — We’ll Leave You To Make Your Own Conclusions About PB Pipe.

 

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The Article Was About Polybutylene Water Pipes

Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C in Plano, Texas provides maintenance & repairs for all brands of Central A/C, Gas & Electric Furnace, and Heat Pumps.    Additionally we sell and install new HVAC Systems from American Standard (same company as Trane), Ameristar (same company as American Standard) and Coleman HVAC (same company as York HVAC).

Al’s also provides full-service plumbing maintenance, repairs and replacements for every plumbing component in your home.  Al’s sells and installs Rheem Professional Series gas & electric water heaters, and tankless water heaters.  Al’s is near your home in Plano, TX; Allen, TX; and Frisco, TX.  We service all homes in southern Collin and Denton Counties with no additional travel charge.

Call Al’s today to discuss any concerns or problems you have with your HVAC System or Plumbing.  We will arrange an appointment at your convenience and offer 24/7 Emergency Service.

As with most industries — plumbing products evolve over time.  In most cases, the new products are less expensive to make and /or easier to install.  In both cases, they reduce the cost to add plumbing to a home.  Additionally, there are many instances where the new product is superior to what it replaced.

For Example: When PVC (white plastic) sewer lines were invented — they became a new industry standard.  No only are they less expensive to make, they are much easier to install.  They also outlast cast iron by as much as double the lifespan.