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This is Part-2 Of Our 2-Part Article Discussing Ways Of Reducing Noise From Outdoors  Entering Your Home.  The article is written for those seeking ways to reduce outside noise from entering their current home.  These are modest to moderate cost upgrades for an existing home.  Additionally, this information is appropriate for a new home being built 

Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C in Plano, Texas provides maintenance & repairs for all brands of Central A/C, Gas & Electric Furnace, and Heat Pumps.  Additionally, we sell and install new HVAC Systems from American Standard (same company as Trane), Ameristar (same company as American Standard) and Coleman HVAC (same company as York HVAC).

Al’s also provides full-service plumbing maintenance, repairs, and replacements for every plumbing component in your home.  Al’s sells and installs Rheem Professional Series gas & electric water heaters, and tankless water heaters.  Al’s is near your home in; Richardson, TX; Garland, TX, and northeastern Dallas, TX.  We service all homes in northern Dallas County, TX; northern Tarrant County, TX; and southern Collin and Denton Counties with no additional travel charge.  Call Al’s today to discuss any concerns or problems you have with your HVAC System or Plumbing.  We will arrange an appointment at your convenience. 

Click Here For Part 1 Of Our Article: Reduce Outside Noise – Part 1

 

Ways Of Reducing Noise Entering Your Home’s Living Space — Part 2 of 2

We’ll start off with two of the most difficult to control noises heard inside homes.  As discussed before, the majority of noise enters a (brick) home through the roof & ceilings.   For aircraft — the type of noise-reducing upgrade needed is different than for highway noise.  This is because of the frequency/pitch of the noises.  Air traffic noise is very boomy (low frequency).  Highway traffic is higher frequency (not boomy).   Effectively reducing noise is dependent on both the volume and frequency of the noise.   We’ll go into detail below.

jet flying over a home

Image Source: ShutterStock

Air-Traffic Noise: Volume & Frequency

Volume (dB) Of  Common Noises:

  • 120 dB Thunder Clap
  •  90 dB Lawn Mower
  •  60 dB Normal Conversation
  • 40 dB Quiet Residential Area

Air-Traffic Noise Volume (in decibels / dB):

  • 94 dB  Boeing 737 jet taking off from 1000 feet — just lifting off the runway.    *5
  • 89 dB  Boeing 737 jet landing from 1000 feet — just touched down on the runway.  *5
  • 68 dB  Boeing 737 jet taking off from 6000 feet — about 1 mile away. *5
  • 76 dB  Boeing 737 landing from 6000 feet — about 1 mile away.    *5

Note: 1 Mile = 5,275 Feet

Note: B-737 is the most common aircraft used in the U.S. today.

Air-Traffic Noise Frequency (in Hertz / Hz):

  • Most aircraft noise is very low frequency (under 200 Hertz-Hz). **
  • Low-frequency noise sounds very boomy.   
  • Thunder is 20-120 Hertz (Hz)

Click To Hear The Noise Homes Under An Air-Traffic Pattern Experience (at time 3:35 / 4:58): YouTube Air Traffic Noise

Copy This Link Into Your Browser For A Manual Of How To Reduce Air Traffic Noise In Your Home: https://www.macnoise.com/sites/macnoise.com/files/pdf/tips.pdf

The Manual Was Written By The Minneapolis / St Paul, MN Metropolitan Council.

*5 Source: https://iaac-aeic.gc.ca/050/documents/p80017/104375E.pdf

*6 Source: file:///C:/Users/ken/Downloads/dot_26137_DS1.pdf

** Source: http://web.mit.edu/aeroastro/partner/reports/proj24/noisethesis.pdf

highway near homes

Image Source: ShutterStock

Highway-Traffic Noise: Volume & Frequency

Highway-Traffic Noise Volume (in decibels / dB):

  • 90 dB  Busy city street *5
  • 76 dB  Highway Traffic — from 50 feet away  *3   
  • +10 dB  16-wheel trucks *4
  • As compared — 40 dB in a quiet residential area

Highway-Traffic Noise Frequency (in hertz):

  • Most traffic noise frequency is around 1,000 hertz. **  
  • The highest frequency in a typical female voice is 1,050 hertz. ***

Click To Hear The Noise From Homes Near Highways Experience (at time 0:33 / 1:40): YouTube Highway Noise At Short Distance

** Source: https://itstillruns.com/frequency-road-noise-6183078.html

** Source: https://www.bexar.org/DocumentCenter/View/19840/Blanco-Phase-II-Noise-Tech-Report

*** Source: https://www.megasorber.com/understanding-noise-levels

*3 Source: https://www.codot.gov/projects/i-70-old-mountaincorridor/final-peis/final-peis-documents/technical-reports/Vol4_I-70_Mntn_Corridor_Final_PEIS_Noise_TR.pdf

*4 Source: http://www.adc40.org/presentations/winter2010/08PresentationTRBWinter2010.pdf

 

The Combination Of A Home’s Roof, Attic, & Ceilings Is Important

In Reducing Noise Coming Into The Living Space (through ceilings)  **

roof shingles

Image Source: ShutterStock

 

DFW Homes Attic Ventilation — Yester Year & Today

If you live in an older DFW home reducing noise from outside starts in the attic.  These homes have large attic-ventilation openings in exterior walls near the peak of the roofs.  They are called: “gable vents”.  These homes typically also have “vent-turbines” visible near the peak of the roof.  Because DFW summers are so hot — the gable-vents are large.  These vents are basically a huge hole in the wall.  They have downward facing boards to keep the rain out — and are designed to allow large amounts of air to come inside the attic.  They’re equally good at allowing large amounts of noise inside the attic.

Click Here To See An Attic Gable Vent From Outside: Attic Gable Vent From Outside

Click Here To See An Attic Gable Vent From Inside The Attic: Attic Gable Vent From Inside The Attic

Particularly if you live under an airport flight-pattern — reducing noise entering the home must include changing the attic ventilation to what new DFW homes have.  This is typically and most easily done when the roof is getting new shingles.  This is because the new ventilation requires removing shingles at the peak of the roof.

  • Most Newer DFW homes have a “Ridge-Vent” located at the peak of the roof.  This vent raises the shingles up one inch at the peak — so hot air can escape the attic.

Click Here To See A Ridge-Vent From Outside:  Attic Ridge Vent From Outside

  • Most Newer DFW homes also have “Soffit Vents” in the soffit area under the roof –(where the roof extends beyond the exterior walls.

Click Here To See A Soffit-Vent From Outside:  Attic Soffit-Vent From Outside

  • Homes with soffit-vents have “Baffles” in the attic — to keep attic insulation from blocking the soffit-vents.

Click Here To See Attic Soffit-Vent Baffles Installed (look at the top of the insulation  — baffles are the same color):  Attic Soffit-Vent Baffles

Ridge vent & soffit vents are greater at reducing noise entering the home due to their design and location.  Soffit-vents (intake air) face the ground — minimizing outside noise from above.  Ridge-vents (exhaust air) run the entire length of the roof — but have only 1″ high holes.  Plus, the noise entering the attic is at the peak of the roof (the farther you are from noise, the less loud it will be).

If you live under an airport flight-pattern, or along a busy street or highway — converting your home to Ridge & Soffit Ventilation will be effective at reducing noise entering your home’s attic and into the living space.   The ridge-vent is typically installed when reroofing the home.  There may be attic-ventilation contractors who will make the conversion without installing a new roof.  You’ll need enough new shingles to cover the work-area, and older shingles will not match the newer ones due to wear & tear.

Once the ridge & soffit ventilation is installed (and inspected to ensure it provides required attic ventilation) — the gable vents can be closed off.   It’s not recommended to add insulation to the underneath side of the roof deck (what the shingles are nailed to).  Air-permeable insulation such; as fiberglass batts, dense-packed cellulose, or blown-in fiberglass can allow moist indoor air to reach the cold roof sheathing, leading to condensation or moisture accumulation in the sheathing.  Insulate the attic floor (which are the ceilings in the rooms below) — and allow ventilation air to flow freely to ensure no moisture builds up in the attic or roof deck.

These Roof, Attic & Ceilings Are Key To Reducing Noise Entering A Home’s Living Space

  • 1. Mass represents the amount & density of material has  For sound to pass through a surface — it must cause the surface to vibrate.   The more material the sound must vibrate — the less vibration will make it through the material.

  • Mass reduces low-frequency noise (boomy noise — like aircraft).

Increasing overhead mass is best done with additional layer(s) of drywall to ceilings.  We discuss this below.

  • 2. Absorption is how much sound-energy gets absorbed as it passes through a material.

  • Absorption reduces higher frequency noise (not boomy — like highway traffic).

measuring insulation level in attic

Shown: Attic Insulation

Image Source: ShutterStock

  • 3. Decoupling represents the space between the roof and the ceilings — reduces both low & high-frequency noise.

  • Sound-energy flows freely through the air until it hits a surface.
  • Then (some or all) of the sound-energy is spent vibrating that surface.
  • Sound-vibrations carry best through direct physical contact.
  • Decoupling is when an open-space is located between separate parts of a structure — so sound-vibrations can’t transfer directly.

home attic with insulation

Shown: Dead-Air Space Between Roof And Ceilings Below (ceilings covered with insulation).

Image Source: ShutterStock

home attic

Shown: Bottom Of Roof Deck Rafters. 

In This Photo — The Roof Deck’s Plywood Is Visible. 

Image Source: ShutterStock

 

Adding Mass To The Roof Deck (what the shingles are nailed to) — Won’t Be Very Effective At Reducing Noise Volume Much

Plywood Does Little To Stop Noise.

There are articles dedicated to the notion of having 2 or more layers of plywood on a home’s roof deck will reduce the volume of low-frequency noise inside the living space.  Adding plywood won’t help much because plywood has limited sound-reducing ability. **  Additionally, there is the risk of a leaking roof allowing water to get between layers of plywood (at nail locations) and rotting the roof from within.   There is also the risk that the home’s structure cannot support the added weight — especially in northern states which can have large amounts of snow on the roof during winter.

To add mass — we recommend adding drywall to the ceilings Note: Consult with a professional qualified to determine if the home’s structure can support the weight of additional layer(s) of drywall.

  • Drywall is a better noise reducer than plywood — because drywall has more mass.
  • The higher the mass — the better the noise reduction.
  • When sound-energy hits a surface — some or all of the sound-energy is spent vibrating a surface.
  • Any remaining sound-energy (after vibrating a surface) — will be heard on the other side.
  • The more mass a material has —  the more sound-vibration energy gets spent making it vibrate.
  • The more sound-energy that’s spent — the less sound that makes it through a surface.
  • 1/2″ 4×8′ Sheet Of Plywood = 66 Pounds
  • 1/2″ 4×8′ Sheet Of Drywall = 45 Pounds
  • Drywall has over 1/2 more weight & mass than plywood.

Source: http://www.derose.net/steve/resources/engtables/materials.html

 

Thicker Shingles Add Roof Mass.  So, it seems reasonable that thicker asphalt or fiberglass shingles may help in reducing outside noise. 

But, There Seems To Be No Shingles’ STC Information Available. 

  • 20-Year Warranty (Certainteed Brand) 3-Tab Shingles weigh 195 pounds per square.   A “Square” = 100 square feet. *4
  • The actual roof life of this shingle is 8-15 years.
  • Outdoor temperature and weather conditions affect roof life.  *4

Note:  There’s little evidence that lighter colored shingles last longer.

Architectural Shingles Are Thicker because they have pieces of additional asphalt (in varying widths) laminated to the shingle. 

  • Architectural shingles have a thicker asphalt-saturated fiberglass mat (at the bottom of the shingles).
  • 50-Year Warranty (Certainteed Brand) Architectural Shingles weigh 240 pounds per square.  *4
  • The actual roof life of this shingle is 17-25 years.  Outdoor temperature and weather conditions affect roof life.

Premium Tri-Laminated Architectural Shingles Are Thicker Than Typical Architectural Shingles.

  • 50-Year Warranty (Certainteed Brand) Premium Architectural Warranty Shingles weigh 480 pounds per square. *4
  • The actual roof life of this shingle is 25-35 years.  Outdoor temperature and weather conditions affect roof life.

** Source: https://www.tdhca.state.tx.us/single-family/training/docs/14-TMCS.pdf

*** Source: https://www.hunker.com/13401243/how-thick-should-a-roof-be

*4 Source: https://www.chasenw.com/blog/asphalt-shingle-comparison-guide/

 

CEILINGS:  STC: 24–52 (depends on attic insulation depth – details below)

room with large ceiling area

Image Source: ShutterStock

With A Brick Home — Ceilings Are The Weakest Link For Outside Noise Intrustion. 

 

What Is Often Not Considered Is The Ceilings’ Surface-Area In Relation To The Living Space.

  • In a one-story home — the ceilings’ surface area = square footage of living space.
  • In a two-story home — the ceilings’ surface area = 1/2 the square footage of living space.
  • Ceiling’s surface area increases if the home has first-floor rooms with no room above (such as vaulted ceiling).

Before investing large sums of money into sound-reducing windows (that represent little of the living space surface-area) — ensure your ceilings offer the best noise-reducing ability. 

  • Improving the ceilings or windows beyond the STC rating of the exterior walls simply causes the walls to become the weakest link.
  • The total sound-reducing ability of the home is mostly dependant on the STC of the ceilings & walls.
  • In a brick home, the STC of the walls is around STC-55 — so improvements for ceilings become the best investment.

Often, the best (and least expensive) way to make a home quieter is to add attic insulation.  Insulation is most effective on higher-frequency noises (like highway traffic) — but reduces the volume of all noises. 

  • STC = 24.5  with 11″ (R-38) blown fiberglass insulation (STC-Insulation = 22 + STC-Drywall = 2.5).
  • Note: R-38 is required by Texas Building Code — so 11″ is likely the attic insulation depth ina new home.
  • STC: 50.5 Ceiling with 24″ (R-86)  blown fiberglass insulation (STC-Insulation = 48 + STC-Drywall = 2.5 ).
  • A reduction of -10 dB is perceived as half the volume to a typical listener.
  • STC: 12+   Add A 2nd Layer Of Drywall To The Ceiling.  The drywall adds mass, and will further reduce low-frequency noise entering the living space.
  • STC: +3–7 Add Sound-Reducing Paint To The Ceiling. (details below)

 

Adding Additional Layer(s) Of Drywall To A Ceiling To Reduce Low-Frequency Noise (like air traffic)

  • The second layer of 5/8″ drywall is installed at a 90-degree angle to the first layer — so the seams (between drywall sheets) don’t line up.  This enhances noise-reduction ability.
  • Use a flexible latex caulk, or an acoustical-sealant to seal gaps and seams.

** Source: https://www.finehomebuilding.com/forum/second-drywall-layer-on-a-ceiling

QuietRock

  • To make double-drywall ceilings more effective — use QuietRock brand drywall.
  • QuietRock can improve the STC Rating by 15-20 points.   It would take 4 layers of typical drywall for the same improvement.  **
  • QuietRock has a flexible material sandwiched between two drywall layers.
  • The drywall adds mass to block soundwaves.
  • The flexible (viscoelastic) material between the drywall layers absorbs some soundwave vibrations.
  • QuietRock-510 is 1/2″ //  QuietRock-530 is 5/8”.

** Source: https://bettersoundproofing.com/quietrock-vs-double-drywall/

Green Glue

  • To make double-drywall ceilings even more effective — apply Green Glue between the drywall panels during installation.
  • Green Glue is a sound-damping material (similar to the material in QuietRock). **
  • Because Green Glue stays flexible, it absorbs sound vibrations well — so they don’t reach the 2nd layer of drywall and vibrate it.  If the 2nd layer of drywall vibrates — you’ll hear the sound in the room.
  • Green Glue converts sound-energy into a tiny amount of heat.   When sound-energy is converted to heat — it’s no longer audible.
  • Apply Green Glue to the back of the second drywall layer.  Raise the 2nd layer into position, and press it against the wall or ceiling.  Then fasten using appropriate screws.  Upon installation, Green Glue squeezes into a thin layer that remains flexible.
  • Note: Green Glue is not an adhesive.

** Sound-Damping Defined: The reduction of sound-energy vibrations.

** Source: https://www.certainteed.com/resources/CTG_1200-GreenGlue-Brochure-Eng.pdf

 

NOTE: Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C does not endorse QuietRock or Green Glue — only because we don’t have first-hand knowledge of these products. 

Exterior Doors STC:

  • Hollow-core wood door – 1 ¾” thick STC= 20
  • Solid-core wood door – 1 ¾” thick STC= 27
  • Steel-faced door – 1 ¾” thick with rigid, polyurethane core STC=26

Source: https://www.hud.gov/sites/documents/DOC_16419.PDF

The best way to reduce noise entering a (properly weather-stripped) outside door is to add a storm door.  This  decouples the sound.  Sound travels best through continuous material.  A break between materials (decoupling) reduces noise-transfer.

 

Additional Ways To Reduce Outside Noise Entering A Home — From Least To Most Expensive.

All Of These Sound-Reduction Efforts Will Also Lower Cooling & Heating Costs

With Interior Furnishings

  • Bookshelves (filled with books) along noisy walls.
  • Floor to ceiling, heavy draperies over windows facing the noise.
  • A high-back chair in front of a noisy window.
  • Heavy Carpet with a heavy pad.
  • Area Rug with a thick pad.

1. SEAL NOISE PATHWAYS

unlocked window with gap between sashes

Locked Windows Close The Gap Between The Lower & Upper Windows

Image Source: ShutterStock

 

photo of caulking around a window

Note: Caulk Gaps Between Windows & Doors And The Exterior Walls.

Image Source: ShutterStock

 

Any Location Where Air Leaks In — Noise Enters Too.  Noise Will Always Take The Easiest Path(s) Into A Home 

  • Exterior Doors: Add weatherstripping to exterior doors.  Check all 4 sides of the door for daylight.
  • Add foam gaskets around electrical outlets and switches.
  • Add child-guards to unused outlets.
  • Interior Doors:  Add a cloth “draft-dodger” under interior doors to close the gap.  The one shown below moves with the door.

Image Source: Amazon Embedded Link

Click On Image To; View Product, Read Details, or Purchase From Amazon.com 

 

2. INCREASE ATTIC INSULATION

photo of blown insulation in an attic

Image Source: Shutterstock

NOTE: 1 inch of blown fiberglass insulation has an STC-2  ***

STC:24   R-38 **/ 11″ of blown fiberglass insulation provides(STC: 22 insulation  + STC: 2.5 drywall).

STC-50.5.  R-86 ** / 24 inches of attic insulation Insulation provides – (STC: 48 insulation + STC: 2.5 dryall)

For each -10db of noise = half the noise volume to a typical listener.

STC-60 is considered excellent noise control.

** Source:https://www.lowes.com/n/calculators/r-value-insulation-calculator

*** Source: https://www.certainteed.com/insulation/benefits-fiberglass-insulation/

3. Sound-Reducing Paint To Ceiling/Walls

Copy The Link Below Into Your Browser To Learn About Coat Of Silence (brand) Sound-Reducing Paint:

https://www.acousticalsurfaces.com/coat-of-silence/coat-of-silence.html

Acoustical Surfaces, Inc. is a sound insulation company located in Chaska, MN.  

This Is From The Coat of Silence Paint Website: 

“Coat of Silence paint is a Spray-On 2-coat process.  By increasing mass to the surface — Coat of Silence sound-absorption paint reduces sound transmission through walls and ceilings.

  • Coat of Silence Base Coat STC:+3–7
  • The base coat forms a rubber membrane as it dries/cures.  This heavy-bodied, latex paint has sound-absorbing fillers.
  • Coat of Silence Finish Coat:
  • The Finish Coat has the same sound deflecting formula as the base coat — plus a hardening-agent.  The Finish Coat adds additional sound-reducing mass.
  • The Finish Coat can be painted over with any type of paint (for colored walls) or wall covering.

** Source: https://www.soundproofingcompany.com/soundproofing_101/understanding-stc-and-stc-ratings

** Source: https://jlaudio.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/217201737-Doubling-Power-vs-Doubling-Output

NOTE: Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C does not endorse Coat Of Silence — only because we don’t have first-hand knowledge of these products. 

 

room with wood floor

Image Source: ShutterStock

4. ADD MASS TO FLOORS (two-story & multi-level homes)

Noise-Control Flooring Underlayment: 

  • STC: 55-65 QT Sound Control “QTscu” floor-underlayment (Recycled Rubber Mat).
  • 5 standard thicknesses are available.  STC depends on the underlayment thickness & the type of floor covering used.
  • STC: 53Homasote 440 SoundBarrier (Recycled Cellulose Fiber Panel).
  • STC: 60 — is considered excellent sound control.

Homasote 440 SoundBarrier® Underlayment Can Be Used On Floors OR Walls.  It’s Made From 98% Recycled Materials

To Learn More About Homasote 440 — Copy This Link Into Your Browser: http://www.homasote.com/assets/files/catalogs/440_brochure.pdf

 

NOTE: Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C does not endorse QT Sound Control or Homasote– only because we don’t have first-hand knowledge of these products. 

 

NOTE: If You Can Temporarily Remove The Sub-Floor — Add Sound-Insulation Between The Lower And Upper Floor

New England Soundproofing “Quiet Insul” (80% recycled cotton fibers).

  • STC-57: 5.5-inch thick Quiet Insul batt  **
  • STC-45:  3.5-inch thick Quiet Insul batt  **

Note: Floor joists are 8″ — 12″ thick.  Thickness depends on the length of area to be spanned (open below).

NOTE: Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C does not endorse Quiet Insul– only because we don’t have first-hand knowledge of the product.

home floor joists

Shown: Floor Joists From Below (this house has a basement).

Image Source: ShutterStock

5. ADD LANDSCAPING BETWEEN HOME AND SOURCE OF NOISE

  • Help break up sound before it reaches your home with landscaping between the home and the noise.  Choose “evergreen” landscaping versus shrubs that drop their leaves in the fall.

landscaping

Image Source: ShutterStock

6. ADD MASS TO EXTERIOR WALLS

A common way to increase mass for ceilings and walls (to reduce exterior noise coming in)  — is to add a 2nd layer of drywall.

If your home has a wall facing noise — adding a 2nd layer of drywall to that wall will notably reduce noise entering the home.

 

STC Rating Improvement With 1 Additional Layer Of Drywall:

  • 39    Interior Wall with 1/2″ Drywall On Each Side  + 3.5″ batt insulation.  Note: Lumber studs inside the wall are 16″ apart.
  • Note: This is typical interior wall construction.
  • STC: +12.  Interior Wall above + 1 Additional Layer of 1/2″ drywall.  
  • A reduction of 10 dB is accepted as half the sound volume to most listeners.
  • Also see details above about adding drywall to ceilings.  The same information applies to walls.

Note: This research was done on interior walls — but it stands to reason the increase of STC: +12 would have the same effect on exterior walls and ceilings.

 

Reducing Noise Generated Within A Space

So far, we have discussed blocking sound from entering a space.  Now we’ll address reducing sound generated within the space.

  • Echo Defined: The reflection of a sound — from a surface back to the listener.
  • To reduce echo, sound must be absorbed or dissipatedbefore it hits hard surfaces and radiates back into the space.
  • Dissipate Defined: Break up & cause to disappear.   Example: The Police arriving often causes crowds to dissipate.
  • Sound Damping Defined:  When sound-energy is dissipated with resistance.

Noise-Reduction Coefficient / NRC

Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) is the percentage of noise a surface absorbs.

NRC rating is what to look for when reducing noise generated within the space.

Sound travels until it meets resistance.  Then some or all of the sound reflects off the surfaces (echos).

Different surfaces absorb some (or all) sound that reaches them.  Sound reflects off harder surfaces more than soft surfaces.

NRC of Common Materials:

  • 0.15 Drywall — drywall bounces 85% of the noise that hits it back into the room.
  • 0.40 Carpet
  • 0.70 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles
  • 1.00 Acoustic Panels — they absorb all sound that hits them.  So they reflect no sound back into the room.

Products For Sound Damping

Sound Damping Defined: Absorb or Dissipate Sound. 

Sound Damping is to stop sound from radiating back into the space after it hits a surface (echo).

Sound Damping Materials Are Specially Designed To Absorb & Dissipate Sound.  

HEAR Sound Damping With This Link: Sound Damping Of Cymbals

Acoustic Wall Panels:

  • Acoustic wall panels absorb sound within the room.
  • They hang on walls.

Product Shown Below:

  • Panels are covered with fabric.
  • These come in ivory (shown), beige, and burgundy.
  • They are 24″ wide X 48″ high X 2″ thick.
  • Their NRC (Noise Reduction Coefficient) of 1.0 out of 1.   This means 100% of the sound reaching them is absorbed.

Image Source: Amazon.com Embedded Link

Click On Image To: View Product, Read Details, or Buy From Amazon.Com

 

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This is Part-2 Of Our 2-Part Article Discussing Ways To Reduce Outdoor Noise From Entering Your Home’s Living Space.  The article is written for those seeking ways to reduce outside noise from entering their current home.  These are modest to moderate cost upgrades for an existing home.  Additionally, this information is appropriate for a new home being built 

Al’s Plumbing, Heating & A/C in Plano, Texas provides maintenance & repairs for all brands of Central A/C, Gas & Electric Furnace, and Heat Pumps.  Additionally, we sell and install new HVAC Systems from American Standard (same company as Trane), Ameristar (same company as American Standard) and Coleman HVAC (same company as York HVAC).

Al’s also provides full-service plumbing maintenance, repairs, and replacements for every plumbing component in your home.  Al’s sells and installs Rheem Professional Series gas & electric water heaters, and tankless water heaters.  Al’s is near your home in; Allen, TX; McKinney, TX, and Frisco, TX.  We service all homes in northern Dallas County, TX; northern Tarrant County, TX; and southern Collin and Denton Counties with no additional travel charge.  Call Al’s today to discuss any concerns or problems you have with your HVAC System or Plumbing.  We will arrange an appointment at your convenience.